Introductions
 

Other Writings by Nell Painter

This page contains of a small sampling from Nell Irvin Painter letters to the editor and unpublished writings. They have been selected because of the availability of the full text, not because they are most important or representative.


Letters to the Editor

  1. The Negro Intellectual on Campus, The Daily Californian, 9 March 1961, p. 9.
  2. In Response to "White Blame, Black Silence," unpublished letter to the New York Times, 15 December 1990.
  3. A Glaring Omission, The Times (Trenton, New Jersey), 18 May 1994, p. A19.

Travelogues

  1. Our Trip to Egypt, 1-9 March 1997
  2. Our Trip to Italy, 5-19 April 1997
  3. Our Trip to Prague, 3-6 May 1997

Miscellaneous

  1. Autobiography for the 30 year reunion of the Class of 1959, Oakland Technical High School. Unpublished. 27 July 1989.
  2. Dissent and Intimidation. Unpublished. 1 April 1991.
  3. The Praxis of a Life of Scholarship: Three Nellie McKay Letters from 1995. In Nellie McKay–A Memorial. Africian American Review, Volume 40, Number 1, Spring 2006:9–12.

Introductions

  1. The Secret Eye: The Journal of Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas, 1848-1889, Edited by Virginia Burr. Introduction and editorial assistance by Nell Painter
  2. "Introduction" to reprinted edition of Jacqueline Bernard, Journey Toward Freedom: The Story of Sojourner Truth, Feminist Press, New York, 1990. The book was originally published in 1967.
  3. "Introduction to Carter G. Woodson, 'The Beginnings of the Miscegenation of the Whites and Blacks,' Journal of Negro History 3, no. 4, October 1918." To appear in a publication of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

The Secret Eye: The Journal of Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas, 1848-1889, Edited by Virginia Burr. Introduction and editorial assistance by Nell Painter

 
   

When Virginia Burr wanted to publish the journal of her great-grandmother, the slave-owner and plantation mistress Ella Gertrude Thomas, she turned to Nell Irvin Painter for advice and guidance. The resulting volume includes a 67-page introduction by Painter, which place Thomas's life and journal in the context of her times and helps the reader follow her sometimes veiled accounts of the realities of slavery, including her anguish about slaves her husband fathered.

Painter's introduction has been reprinted as a chapter of Southern History Across the Color Line.



"Introduction" to reprinted edition of Jacqueline Bernard, Journey Toward Freedom: The Story of Sojourner Truth, Feminist Press, New York, 1990. The book was originally published in 1967.

Journey Toward Freedom book image  
   

Born a slave in 1797, Sojourner Truth eventually gained her freedom and became known for her wit, her songs, and her great common sense. She electrified audiences as she championed civil rights, women's rights, prison reform, and better working conditions. In the New York Times Book Review, Richard Ellman wrote: "Quietly factual when it suits her story, but lyrical when the demand arises, Jacqueline Bernard has succeeded on nearly every account. A good popular history."

 
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